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Keep Moving Forward

Posted on 10/02/2021

We have heard it a lot lately. “These are trying times….we must take care of our mental health and wellbeing….. eat well… keep your social distance” …… and the list goes on. There is no doubt that these are important things for us to consider but I would like to start this, my first Blog, to say this.

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We have heard it a lot lately. “These are trying times….we must take care of our mental health and wellbeing….. eat well… keep your social distance” …… and the list goes on. There is no doubt that these are important things for us to consider but I would like to start this, my first Blog, to say this.

“You are all great….. You are all courageous….. I am proud to bear witness to all that you have been achieving.”

We can point the finger at others, at government agencies for not doing this or someone not doing that, but we must remember that there are positives all around us too.

I have seen people sharing their food with others. People helping the elderly the young, the disadvantaged. I have seen children helping their parents without question. I have seen some pretty amazing things really and on some occasions, I have been truly humbled. As we keep moving forward I think that it is important to remember these things and try to remind ourselves that we too are good, we too can help and we too can…… well……. be happy. It's ok.

Regards,

Paul Talan

Head of Centre

DGHE

 

Rainbow Themes

Posted on 10/02/2021

Be warned, today’s blog will be a long one! It’s not just a reflection, it’s a little bit of a history lesson too.

Archbishop Desmond Tutu used the term ‘Rainbow nation’ to describe post-apartheid South Africa and President Nelson Mandela wanted the ‘rainbow nation to be at peace with itself and the world’.  

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Be warned, today’s blog will be a long one! It’s not just a reflection, it’s a little bit of a history lesson too.

Archbishop Desmond Tutu used the term ‘Rainbow nation’ to describe post-apartheid South Africa and President Nelson Mandela wanted the ‘rainbow nation to be at peace with itself and the world’.

At the time of its adoption, the South African flag was the only national flag in the world to comprise six colours in its primary design (without a seal and brocade). Three colours were taken from the South African Republic and the Union Jack flags while the remaining three colours were taken from the African National Congress’ flag – a true coming together of minds and spirit.

Rainbow flags are often used as a sign of a new era, of hope, or of social change.  They’ve been used in many places over the centuries: as a symbol of peace, especially in Italy; in the German Peasants’ War in the 16th century, as a symbol of the Cooperative movement; to represent the Tawantin Suyu, or Inca territory, mainly in Peru and Bolivia; by some Druze communities in the Middle East; by the (Russian) Jewish Autonomous Oblast; and as a symbol of gay pride and LGBT+ social movements since the 1970s.

This month is LGBT+ History Month and the theme is ‘Body, Mind and Spirit’, very much in harmony with current Covid-times and the meaning of the flag.

The Pride flag dates back to 1978 but the best-known is the six-colour version. The meaning of its colours are largely recognised as red for life, orange for healing, yellow for sunlight , green for nature, blue for harmony and purple for spirit.

Today, the flag is flown as a sign of inclusion and welcome. As an image, it reminds us of not only the diversity of sexual orientation but also of the diversity of human beings and their characteristics as a whole. The largest rainbow flag in the Southern Hemisphere was a six-stripe one first flown to mark the fourth Nelson Mandela Bay (NMB) Pride in 2014 held in the Eastern Cape area.

Rodney Wilson, an American high school teacher, started LGBT History Month in 1994. While teaching about the Holocaust, Wilson revealed to his class that he was gay and shared with them that this was something he could have been killed for at that time.

Recently, in the UK the Rainbow has become a symbol for the NHS and many businesses display it with the words ‘Thank you NHS’. This gesture is not without controversy.

To quote Sophie Harvey: ‘I first came out in 2016, and the gay flag became a huge part of my life because it was something that represented me and my struggles, and the struggles that the others in my community go through. Seeing a flag that holds so much pain and passion be used for something entirely different is heart-breaking. It’s not just a rainbow to us, it’s the story of our people and our history’. She says the cop-opting of the flag is ‘heart-breaking’.

Channel 4’s recent mini-series ‘It’s a Sin’ is a retrospective of HIV/AIDs crisis in 1980s-London. Its creator Russell T Davis cited the ‘overreaction and lack of reaction’ to the pandemics, as well as the focus on social distancing as history [repeating] itself’. One character’s HIV/AIDS denialism is likened to Covid-19 conspiracy theorists. An extraordinary coming together of mind and spirit happened in the UK in 1985 when representatives from mining groups joined the Lesbians and Gays Support the Miners group (LGSM) on the march. This was in recognition of the support given to striking miners by LGSM.

I’ll share some thoughtful and powerful words by poets and wordsmiths with you:

‘Why would I spend my life chasing rainbows when I can be still and see them in their full beauty’ (Rasheed Ogunlaru)

If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his own language, that goes to his heart. (Nelson Mandela)

Did you know, in South Africa’s Xhosa culture, the rainbow is associated with hope and a bright future?

All that we can all hope for, is a bright future. We are all human beings together on our life’s journey, with the same feelings, hopes and fears no what matter what our culture, race, or orientation is.

It’s not just a rainbow to us, it’s the story of our people and our history’.

Be at peace with yourself and the world.

‘Dare to love yourself
as if you were a rainbow
with gold at both ends.’

(Author-Poet Aberjhani)

For those wanting to explore more about LGBT+ History month, click on the links below, lots of interesting events and information:  

 

Friendship

Posted on 21/01/2021 

Can you believe it, it’s just over a year since we heard about Covid-19 for the first time and what a life-changing journey it has sent us on! We couldn’t have imagined most of what has happened to us over this time in our wildest dreams.

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Can you believe it, it’s just over a year since we heard about Covid-19 for the first time and what a life-changing journey it has sent us on! We couldn’t have imagined most of what has happened to us over this time in our wildest dreams.

While things have been difficult, not all of it has been bad. For many of us the one thing that has remained constant and true throughout is our friendships: be that one friend, a few friends or many – and maybe some new ones. Lots of people have got to know their neighbours for the first time during this last year.

I was recently given a little token that said: ‘…Friendship isn’t about who you’ve known the longest. It’s about who walked into your life, said ‘I’m here for you’ and proved it…..’. Many friends are of course for life but many come and go throughout our lives, serving a particular need at the time and are no less valuable or loved because they were only around for a short while.  

They say friends are like the family you choose – although unlike family they are solely joy-based! In our friends we look for those who share similar qualities and interests, people to whom we can reveal our real selves without fear of judgement or rejection.

Friendship is an opportunity to love, to learn about yourself, to mature as a human being, and to open up to the full experience of life. Good friends are so important to our mental health and to the quality of our lives.  Like any relationship, friendships require work - we have to nurture them as well as be nurtured by them.

Not everyone is outgoing and has lots of friends, no matter what age or sex you are. You may be shy/anxious and find it too hard to build/maintain lasting friendships. Even if you have loads of friends and support, even if you are living with family or housemates, you may still be feeling isolated and lonely this year, especially now we are locked down again here in the UK.

Helpguide.org has a great section on making good friends  and offers help for when you’re feeling isolated, alone and disconnected from friends and family

 I’ll leave you with a little poem about friendship by Jessica R Dallinger that you might like:

If you're feeling down; turn your frown upside down.
Put a smile on your face; take the world in your embrace.
Ask for a little help from the man up above.
And remember you have your best friend's love.

Thank you,

Ms. Fiona Nouri,

Head of Student Experience & Wellbeing

 

What is an HND Qualification?

Posted on 16/01/2021

Do you want to apply for an “HND” course, or may have heard about the Higher National Diploma, but don’t know what is it?

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Do you want to apply for an “HND” course, or may have heard about the Higher National Diploma, but don’t know what is it?

Higher education institutions like colleges and universities in the United Kingdom offer a variety of courses to their students. These courses could be of different levels and vary from basic to advance levels like HNC, HND, Bachelor, Master’s Degree, and so on.

A Higher National Diploma (HND) is a career-focused qualification recognised by a range of organisations around the world, including employers, professional bodies, higher education institutions, and governments. This qualification is internationally-recognised and highly valued by employers.

 The main focus of this diploma course is to develop hands-on experience and practical skillsthat allow people to make progress in their lives through learning. Hence this qualification is much sought after by employers.

The HND is equivalent to the second year of a university course and it could lead to direct entry into the workplace after graduation. It typically takes two years to complete a full-time HND course. There are plenty of progression opportunities depending upon your choice of programme. You can Top-Up an HND qualification to a degree course in just one year, or you may decide to start work right after finishing your HND qualification.

Entry requirements for HND courses

To gain entry into the HND course, you will need some previous qualifications such as one A-level, or an equivalent UK Level 3, or an overseas qualification.  It is always recommended to check with the college or the university where you are applying to clarify their entry requirements.

You can check at DGHE to find the requirements for the courses it offers.

What can you do with the HND qualification?

It entirely depends on students what they want to do with their HND qualification. As students gain practical skills during their HND and have the choice to join a workplace, many of them would like to Top-Up their qualifications to a full Bachelor’s Degree.  HND qualification will strengthen the hands-on skills needed for a particular job and this is why the qualification is highly valued by employers.

So you can do the following things after your HND:

  • Join workplace
  • Top-Up to a Bachelor’s Degree

 

Why choose DGHE in London for HND Qualification?

There are many reasons for a student to choose DGHE and we take pride in teaching students from all over the world. Our prime location in the heart of the city of London makes DGHE an ideal place to study. 

Consider the following 10 reasons why David Game Higher Education could be your best choice for an HND qualification.

  • Our excellent reputation as a top academic institution with over 45 years of experience.
  • Highly qualified and professional teaching staff with relevant industry experience.
  • The supportive atmosphere, small classroom environment, and vocational outlook nurture students into desirable assets with both holistic wellbeing and professional skills.
  • Our accessible location within the downtown business district of London.
  • The diverse and inclusive environment and a friendly culture that supports our students professionally and personally.
  • Our supportive staff will encourage your academic success through active listening, inspirational, and practical experience-based teaching and compassion.
  • Frequent events on campus, in the local community, and online to enhance the coed experience.
  • Career-oriented opportunities including career fairs, personalised career support centre, and keynote speakers.
  • A Corporate Social Responsibility centered college that embraces different initiatives supporting diverse communities, the environment, and the arts.
  • Our state-of-the-art building is well equipped with all the necessary technology to facilitate lessons and adorned with a large collection of paintings by contemporary and well-regarded artists, including Edward Stone and Keith Grant.

 

Which HND level 5 qualifications are offered by DGHE?

The Higher National Diploma level 5 qualifications awarded by Pearson are designed to provide our students with specialist vocational programmes, which are each linked to a professional body and national occupation standard requirements where appropriate. Our HND courses emphasise practical skills development alongside the development of required foundational knowledge and theoretical understanding related to the relevant sector.

DGHE offers the following HND courses:

To find more information about our HND courses please contact us or Apply today!

 

 

Managing Grief Through The Holidays

Posted  3/12/ 2020

The Christmas or holiday season will soon be with us.

It’s a time for family and friends, but I know that a lot of us here at DGHE will be experiencing our first Christmas holiday season without a loved one, friend, or colleague because they have passed away.

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The Christmas or holiday season will soon be with us.

It’s a time for family and friends, but I know that a lot of us here at DGHE will be experiencing our first Christmas holiday season without a loved one, friend, or colleague because they have passed away.  

I have only been at DGHE for a short while, but I know that ‘Loss’ has been a big theme for all of us here this year. It’s not just the people we’ve lost and have not been able to bury and grieve for in the usual way according to our beliefs and cultures. It’s all the other things we have lost too – our freedom to go where we want when we want, our lifestyles, incomes, jobs, homes, schooling, our ability to just hold and hug each other in hard times. We experience grief in all its stages for all these things. I just wanted us to take a moment to acknowledge these losses.

This week is National Grief Awareness Week. Distance shouldn’t mean we can’t share our grief.

If you have experienced bereavement, you may find support via the ‘GoodGrief Trust’, a charity run by the bereaved for the bereaved.

I will leave you with a simple poem, which I hope will lift your hearts and souls whenever you think of your lost ones. This simple Native American verse comforts and reminds us that a person’s spirit can never die. If we hold them in our hearts, they can remain with us each and every day.

I give you this one thought to keep.
I am with you still. I do not sleep.

I am a thousand winds that blow.
I am the diamond glints on the snow.
I am the sunlight on ripened grain.
I am the gentle autumn rain.

When you awaken in the morning’s hush,
I am the swift, uplifting rush
of quiet birds in circled flight.
I am the soft stars that shine at night.

Do not think of me as gone.
I am with you still in each new dawn.

Thank you,

Ms. Fiona Nouri,

Head of Student Experience & Wellbeing

 

 

Updates on Career Opportunities During COVID-19

Posted 21/05/2020

Dear Students,

Welcome to the fifth edition of the DGHE Careers Blog!

I recently took part in a webinar regarding job opportunities for students in the current crisis and I wanted to share some of the discussion with you here. One of the key speakers was Charlie Ball who is Head of Higher Education Intelligence at Jisc. This is some of what he had to say about the different career sectors… 

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Dear Students,

Welcome to the fifth edition of the DGHE Careers Blog!

I recently took part in a webinar regarding job opportunities for students in the current crisis and I wanted to share some of the discussion with you here

It is no surprise that post-graduate study applications are predicted to increase as current students seek to gain further qualifications in order to be better qualified once we emerge from the crisis.

Vacancy data shows that job vacancies are down 60%, however 53,000 vacancies were added last week, so this is not a signal to stop applying as the graduate labour market has not ceased. The sectors most affected are non-graduate including hospitality, beauty and events (although this sector may be able to adapt). Downturns always affect the least qualified the hardest.

 

And good news for DGHE students…

The public services are all recruiting including paramedics.

In the financial services – some say this is an opportunity for this sector as they can be agile and pivot to offering debt and insolvency services. The Irland Revenue will recruit in a staggered way over the next few months as they are short of staff and the government needs to keep taking our taxes!

If any of you are interested in teaching, work experience for new teachers will be challenging, however the new year seven is the largest for a long time so more teachers will be needed.p>

And from the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) … The current crisis is particularly critical for cultural and creative sectors due to the sudden and massive loss of revenue opportunities, especially for the more fragile players. Some sectors benefit from public support (e.g. public museums, libraries, theatres) but may experience significant budget shortfalls. The sector includes major multinational companies with sustainable revenues (e.g. Netflix), but many small companies and freelance professionals essential for the sector could face bankruptcy. This crisis creates a structural threat to the survival of many firms and workers in cultural and creative production.

However, today, more than ever, the importance of culture and creativity for society is clear. The availability of cultural content contributes to mental health and well-being, and many cultural institutions have provided online and free content in recent weeks for that purpose. Sustainable business models during and after the initial crisis are imperative for the sector’s survival. Leaving behind the more fragile part of the sector could cause irreparable economic and social damage. The current challenge is to design public supports that alleviate the negative impacts in the short term and help identify new opportunities in the medium term for different public, private and non-profit sectors engaged in cultural and creative production.

In terms of geographical areas which are likely to be the hardest hit, regionally disadvantaged areas will suffer most. London will take the smallest hit, however some areas like Bradford and Leicester where there are mixed economies will also be hit less hard.

So, a mixed message, but not all bad. Do keep studying and working hard, although at times this might be tricky! Keep looking forward, thinking and planning your career and how you would like it to be. If you need any support at all with any career-related matter do contact me at angela.kinloch@dghe.ac.uk I have been successfully working with students using Zoom, email and the telephone.

Best wishes,

Angela Kinloch,

Careers & Employability Consultant, DGHE

 

 

Keep Applying for Job Vacancies and Internships

Posted 17/04/2020 

Welcome to the fifth DGHE Careers Blog. Yesterday I took part in a webinar with the Institute of Student Employers (ISE)  on Managing Recruitment in a Crisis led by Stephen Isherwood, ISE's CEO and I wanted to share some of the information with you…  

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Welcome to the fifth DGHE Careers Blog. Yesterday I took part in a webinar with the Institute of Student Employers (ISE)  on Managing Recruitment in a Crisis led by Stephen Isherwood, ISE's CEO and I wanted to share some of the information with you…  

The overriding message is to…

“keep applying for vacancies and internships” because organisations are quickly changing their ways of working, so where possible they are still accepting applications.

As you would expect there are some caveats:

  • 27% employers are recruiting fewer graduates
  • 31% less interns and placement students

However,

  • 60% have moved assessment centres online
  • 71% have moved interviews online

So, the many organisations which are still working will handle their recruitment processes differently embracing telephone and video interviews, Zoom assessment centres etc.  For support with this, see my previous Careers Blog on “Ten Top Tips for Phone and Video Interviews”. 

You might be surprised to hear that some internships are still going ahead but they are changing. From the Employer ‘Town Hall’ feedback we know that employers are:

  • Seeking to shorten placements, move them online or to offer alternative online experiences
  • Deliver a range of skills-based training activities online for their interns. These can be grouped together, and recognition offered for students who complete all activities.
  • Connecting interns with a mentor in their organisation as this can provide them with insights into the organisation even if they can’t run a full internship.

So, the overriding message is to… 

  • Keep applying, but be prepared to be flexible and undertake an online project for an employer and then present solutions back to the employer, instead of a traditional internship at the employers’ premises

For job vacancies and internships try the following:

  • Employers’-own websites If you have specific companies in mind, then explore and apply directly through their own sites. For larger organisations, you may be able to search for ‘graduate opportunities’, ‘early careers’ or ‘experienced hires’, depending on your circumstances. Tip: Follow these organisations on your LinkedIn and social media platforms.
  • You can directly search and apply for jobs on professional networking sites such as LinkedIn (www.linkedin.com)  and other social media platforms.
  • So join LinkedIn.  Put together an online profile.  This is straightforward to do, but remember to check all your spelling and grammar is correct.  I can help you with this if you contact me at a.kinloch@dghe.ac.uk  Once on LinkedIn you can start to build a network and follow companies you are interested in to see how and when they are recruiting
  • For lots of other useful careers advice and potential vacancies also look at:  https://www.prospects.ac.uk/graduate-jobs
  • https://targetjobs.co.uk/
  • You can search sites such as Agency Central (www.agencycentral.co.uk)  for a list of recruitment agencies. Think about which agencies will best benefit you and your career. Developing relationships with two or three, particularly in your location or with your specific sector specialism, could be time well spent.
  • Don’t forget traditional newspapers, hardcopy or online. From national daily newspapers to local papers and trade journals, the traditional news media is still a good source of vacancies. Make a note of their advertising patterns; you will find that most of the newspapers advertise certain sectors or roles on particular days of the week. Find local and national newspapers at the Paperboy www.thepaperboy.com/uk 

And finally, a word of caution: beware of job scams

  • Unfortunately, not all advertised jobs are legitimate, and you will need to be wary of opportunities that look too good to be true. Look out for the following red flags:
  • Do the contact details look appropriate for the organisation? Are they using personal or random email addresses?
  • Is the advert badly written?
  • Is the salary realistic for the role?
  • Are they asking YOU for money?
  • Are they asking for personal details, such as your bank details or driver’s licence information?
  • Did they offer you a job as soon as you sent your CV?

With best wishes,

Angela Kinloch, Careers & Employability Consultant, DGHE a.kinloch@dghe.ac.uk

 

 

Work and Volunteering Opportunities Whilst we are Living with the Threat of the CORONAVIRUS

Posted 08/04/2020 

Dear students,

Welcome to the fourth edition of the DGHE Careers Blog!  

You don’t need me to tell you that we are all living in very strange times. 

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Dear students,

Welcome to the fourth edition of the DGHE Careers Blog!  

You don’t need me to tell you that we are all living in very strange times.

Some of you may have lost your part-time jobs and so it may be vital for you to consider other opportunities which allow you to stay safe and still receive some income whilst studying online.   Here are a few places you might look:

  • Follow the Job Centre Plus twitter posts regarding latest jobs
  • Look at local large employers/supermarkets who tweet their jobs
  • Look at the NHS and care related tweets and LinkedIn posts
  • Regarding NHS Volunteer Responder Opportunities, here is their latest post as at 7/4/20:

“We have now paused recruitment and kindly ask anyone who is still interested in volunteering to wait a few weeks for the application process to reopen.
Please keep an eye on @GoodSamApp and @RoyalVolService for updates.”

You may be able to devote some time to volunteering.  Do bear in mind that including volunteering as well as paid opportunities on your CV is very important as it will indicate to employers that you are community spirited, a good team player, etc.

Here are some useful volunteering sites:   

Or you could create your own volunteering opportunity:

For example, if you’re interested in helping others and there is a need in your community, could you set up a support group?  See:  https://www.selfhelp.org.uk/  and for advice on how to set up a volunteer scheme: https://knowhow.ncvo.org.uk/  

I can still help you with your CV, job applications any other careers-related matter, just contact me at a.kinloch@dghe.ac.uk   

Very best wishes to you all,

Angela Kinloch, Careers & Employability Consultant, DGHE

 

 

10 Top Tips on for Phone and Video Interviews

Posted 01/04/2020 

Dear students,

Welcome to the third DGHE Careers Blog!  You can still access the previous blogs on CV Writing and Cover Letter Writing.

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Dear students,

Welcome to the third DGHE Careers Blog!  You can still access the previous blogs on CV Writing and Cover Letter Writing.

Video or telephone interviews are often part of the recruitment process.  Now whilst the Virus is plaguing all our lives’ they will become central to the process and so you need to be prepared:

Treat a telephone or video interview in exactly the same way as a face-to-face interview – be prepared…

 

Dress professionally. This means wearing clothes which are clean and smart.  Even if the employer cannot see you during a phone interview wearing the correct clothes will give you more confidence and so help your interview performance. 
 
Make sure you are somewhere quiet where you can concentrate.

 

Test the link before a video interview is about to begin and adjust the audio if necessary.

 

Do exactly the same research and preparation as you would normally.  This means finding out as much as you can about the organisation and the role.  Start with the Job Description and Person Specification if they have been supplied.  Look at the company website.  Who are their competitors?  Who are their customers?  What is their Mission Statement?  Do they publish their company values? Look at their News Section.  Follow the organisation on Twitter and LinkedIn.

 

Think about the type of questions the employer could ask you.  These questions are likely to be geared around the Job Description and Person Specification so look at these documents closely.  If the JD asks for a candidate with good team working skills, think about when you have demonstrated these skills and be ready to describe a scenario to the employer.  If a Job Description and Person Specification has not been supplied, study the advert closely to gauge the type of questions you are likely to be asked.

 

 
You could use the STAR method of answering questions:
 
  • S = situation – what is the context
  • T = task – what were you trying to achieve
  • A = action – what action did you take
  • R = result – what was the result

 

If you are talking over the phone and not on video you will need to talk very clearly and pause frequently for the other person to speak.  

 

For phone interviews you might want to have notes in front of you.  Write them clearly so that you can easily refer to them.
 
Whether on the phone or on video it is perfectly permissible to have a brief note of the questions you would like to ask an employer.  These could include, “How do you see the organisation developing over the next year?”  “What would you like me to achieve in my first month in the role?” “Please describe a typical day for the successful candidate?
       
For more really useful information look at:   https://www.prospects.ac.uk/careers-advice/interview-tips/telephone-interviews
 
Remember, I am happy to help you practise over the telephone or via Zoom so do contact me on a.kinloch@dghe.ac.uk 
 
Best wishes,
Angela Kinloch,  Careers & Employability Consultant

 

 
 

Last updated: 09/04/21